The Tablet of Azaria - VW Ignacio V. Illenberger / Awarded by VW Alexander E. Yu

(Description of Deeds, to be read during awarding, in plaque at back of tablet or table nameplate)

The Tablet of AZARIA

Masonic tradition informs us that at the building of the first temple of the Hebrews, three grand masters presided over the proceedings of the Craft. King Solomon, the initiator of that great undertaking sat at the Grand Oriental Chair. Solomon’s principal ally, the Phoenician King Hiram of Tyre sat at the Grand West Station. At the Grand South Station sat the temple’s Chief Architect, the Grand Master Hiram Abiff, a widow’s son from the Hebrew tribe of Neptali whose father was a deceased artificer of metals from Tyre. When Hiram Abiff was killed inside the precincts of the Temple of Solomon during its construction, the two kings feared of a wider conspiracy. Solomon proceeded to enlist the services of his boyhood friend AZARIA to act as roving inspector and inquisitor to the workings of the lodges of stoneworkers, carpenters, metal artificers and workers on gold which were found disrespectful of the laws of the land.   AZARIA with his brother Zabud were classmates of Solomon in the School of Scribes (Notary Public) ran by King David’s high priest Aviathar.

The zealousness of AZARIA in enforcing the laws was balanced with his wisdom and probity which were in keeping with the policies of his monarch Solomon. In the furtherance of his duties, AZARIA was in constant danger to follow the fate of the slain Grand Master Hiram Abiff. To AZARIA, fidelity to his duties was a much higher consideration than the associated perils.

WB BENITO K. TAN is a past master of Labong Lodge No. 59 and a past grand line officer. He has been called upon by the brethren of his lodge through the years to assume a variety of duties that are shirked by others. During these postings WB TAN remained consistent to the proposition that adherence to the Masonic Law Book and the concept of equitability are the fundamental rules of harmony. For almost twenty years, WB TAN has lived up to the finest traditions of the vocation of scribes first exemplified by our operative ancestor AZARIA.

As another Masonic year has again given way to the ensuing year, we, his brethren, humbly bestow this emblem.

Done on February 2, 2013

WB ALEXANDER E. YU, PM

 

 

(Citation in tablet if in plaque form)

The Tablet of AZARIA

This simple emblem of the legacy of AZARIA, a scribe by vocation and roving inspector and inquisitor of King Solomon to the lodges of temple builders, is humbly bestowed upon:

WB BENITO K. TAN, PM, PGLO

                

WB BENITO K. TAN is a past master of Labong Lodge No. 59 and a past grand line officer. He has been called upon by the brethren of his lodge through the years to assume a variety of duties that are shirked by others. During these postings WB TAN remained consistent to the proposition that adherence to the Masonic Law Book and the concept of equitability are the fundamental rules of harmony.

The scribe AZARIA, served as King Solomon’s roving inspector and inquisitor to the lodges of temple builders. The zealousness of AZARIA in enforcing the laws was balanced with his wisdom and probity which were in keeping with the policies of his monarch Solomon. In the furtherance of his duties, AZARIA was in constant danger to follow the fate of the slain Grand Master Hiram Abiff. To AZARIA, fidelity to his duties was a much higher consideration than the associated perils.

For almost twenty years, WB TAN has lived up to the finest traditions of the vocation of scribes first exemplified by our operative ancestor AZARIA.

As another Masonic year has again given way to the ensuing year, we, his brethren, humbly bestow this tablet.

Done on the occasion of my relinquishing the Oriental Chair, I hereby affix my signature:

WB ALEXANDER E. YU, PM

February 2, 2013

 

 

(Etching in front, if tablet is in table nameplate form)

WB BENITO K. TAN, PM, PGLO

Descendant of AZARIA, Scribe and Roving Inspector and Inquisitor

 

 

 

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